the afternoon love-in pastiche

archivist. dj. polyglot.

www.dublab.com/t-kay
@tttkay

#mezcal #cocktail with #basil #soda and #mint from the #garden 4 notes

#mezcal #cocktail with #basil #soda and #mint from the #garden

#neon #color #coordination

#neon #color #coordination

these are way too cute to cook, @jam_dont_shake! #hellokitty #macaroni #pasta #kawaii #food 1 note

these are way too cute to cook, @jam_dont_shake! #hellokitty #macaroni #pasta #kawaii #food

<3 @terryx666
librarianwardrobe:

Starting up a new week of author interviews, today we look at archivist stereotypes for The Librarian Stereotype: Deconstructing Perceptions and Presentations of Information Work on ACRL Press.
Terry Baxter is an archivist with the Multnomah County Records Program in Portland, Oregon
Q1: Provide a brief summary of your chapter 
It’s not just librarians with image problems! Archivists have them, too. Dusty, musty, shy, introverted – we’ve heard them all, gentle readers. This chapter discusses the image of archivists through the lenses of archival activism and community archives. While it focuses on the role of archivists and archives in Portland, Oregon’s queer community, most of the issues and conclusions are extensible to other archivists and communities across the United States. 
Q2: What do you think is one of the most pressing issues regarding the librarian (/archivist) stereotype?
One of the most pressing issues regarding the librarian stereotype is the dearth of qualified tattoo artists to meet the demand of ink-crazed librarians. JK, librarians! We archivists value diverse representations, too. I actually think my chapter reflects more on archivist stereotypes than librarian ones. Librarians have been very good at transitioning from an obsession with the stuff to one with people. Archivists are getting there, but perceptions about them still lag behind.
Q3: What sparked your interest to write this chapter?
I believe that everyday people often shy away from archives and archivists because of the misperceptions they have about them. But archives are powerful tools of change and need to be in more diverse hands and used for more diverse purposes. We archivists should always be breaking down barriers to the creative use of archives and figuring out ways to make our records and ourselves more accessible to people.
Q5: Who is your librarian role model? 
I have two. The first is Cheryl Metoyer. She gave a presentation in 2004 that fundamentally changed the way I have approached my work. Much of the literature around archival activism and social justice is grounded in theory. While that’s important, Cheryl’s depiction of the role of the heart and beauty in the work librarians do has been a guiding star for my own work in archives. The second is my mom, Pearl Baxter. She was my high school librarian at a small boarding school in Penang, Malaysia. In my high school summers, I learned how to reshelve, repair, select resources, catalog – all in the name of “keeping me out of trouble.” My mom was uncredentialed, but it was from her that I learned that libraries and librarians created vital spaces for interaction – with others, with ideas, with our own selves. 
Q5: Tell us something fun about yourself!
I have been blessed with a mostly fun life. One thing that people might be surprised at is that right in the middle of a 28-year career as a professional archivist, I owned a construction business with my brother. It failed after a couple years, but it was fun while it lasted and I learned new things and met new people. If you need a new deck …
36 notes

<3 @terryx666

librarianwardrobe:

Starting up a new week of author interviews, today we look at archivist stereotypes for The Librarian Stereotype: Deconstructing Perceptions and Presentations of Information Work on ACRL Press.

Terry Baxter is an archivist with the Multnomah County Records Program in Portland, Oregon

Q1: Provide a brief summary of your chapter 

It’s not just librarians with image problems! Archivists have them, too. Dusty, musty, shy, introverted – we’ve heard them all, gentle readers. This chapter discusses the image of archivists through the lenses of archival activism and community archives. While it focuses on the role of archivists and archives in Portland, Oregon’s queer community, most of the issues and conclusions are extensible to other archivists and communities across the United States. 

Q2: What do you think is one of the most pressing issues regarding the librarian (/archivist) stereotype?

One of the most pressing issues regarding the librarian stereotype is the dearth of qualified tattoo artists to meet the demand of ink-crazed librarians. JK, librarians! We archivists value diverse representations, too. I actually think my chapter reflects more on archivist stereotypes than librarian ones. Librarians have been very good at transitioning from an obsession with the stuff to one with people. Archivists are getting there, but perceptions about them still lag behind.

Q3: What sparked your interest to write this chapter?

I believe that everyday people often shy away from archives and archivists because of the misperceptions they have about them. But archives are powerful tools of change and need to be in more diverse hands and used for more diverse purposes. We archivists should always be breaking down barriers to the creative use of archives and figuring out ways to make our records and ourselves more accessible to people.

Q5: Who is your librarian role model? 

I have two. The first is Cheryl Metoyer. She gave a presentation in 2004 that fundamentally changed the way I have approached my work. Much of the literature around archival activism and social justice is grounded in theory. While that’s important, Cheryl’s depiction of the role of the heart and beauty in the work librarians do has been a guiding star for my own work in archives. The second is my mom, Pearl Baxter. She was my high school librarian at a small boarding school in Penang, Malaysia. In my high school summers, I learned how to reshelve, repair, select resources, catalog – all in the name of “keeping me out of trouble.” My mom was uncredentialed, but it was from her that I learned that libraries and librarians created vital spaces for interaction – with others, with ideas, with our own selves. 

Q5: Tell us something fun about yourself!

I have been blessed with a mostly fun life. One thing that people might be surprised at is that right in the middle of a 28-year career as a professional archivist, I owned a construction business with my brother. It failed after a couple years, but it was fun while it lasted and I learned new things and met new people. If you need a new deck …

working at a library is like having a birthday every day. gifts of records and books just turn up on your doorstep, like this beautiful 10&#8221; of brazilian poets vinicius de moraes and paulo mended campos reading their work. #librarianlife 1 note

working at a library is like having a birthday every day. gifts of records and books just turn up on your doorstep, like this beautiful 10” of brazilian poets vinicius de moraes and paulo mended campos reading their work. #librarianlife

POC librarians dropping knowledge!

librarianwardrobe:

Our authors examine issues surrounding diversity of academic librarians in this chapter of The Librarian Stereotype: Deconstructing Presentations and Perceptions of Information Work. Book will be out before ALA on ACRL Press!

Isabel Gonzalez-Smith is an Academic Resident Librarian in reference and instruction at the University of Illinois of Chicago

Juleah Swanson is an Assistant Professor and Acquisitions Librarian for Electronic Resources at the Ohio State University Libraries

Azusa Tanaka is a Japanese Studies Librarian at University of Washington 

Q1: Provide a brief summary of your chapter

The motivation for our chapter “Unpacking Identity: Racial, Ethnic and Professional Identity and Academic Librarians of Color” was the question of why in spite of evolving efforts, does racial and ethnic diversity among academic librarians remain virtually unchanged? And what impact working in a predominantly white profession has on people of color working in academic libraries?

As people of color and as librarians, we approached the chapter from a place more fundamental, personal, and introspective, looking beyond the recruitment, retention, and diversity initiatives that may have brought us into our roles as academic librarians. As we began to explore the internalized experiences, we learned that people develop their sense of self through the external - society, environment, profession, etc. What we discovered was that identity theory helps to articulate, and begin to understand, the experiences of academic librarians of color.

But what is most exciting about this chapter are the voices of other academic librarians of color found throughout the text. Their quotes help to illustrate and contextualize the theory, but also offers a compelling and poignant window into the experiences of librarians of color in academia.

Q2: What do you think is one of the most pressing issues regarding the librarian stereotype?

The fact that the profession, particularly in academic libraries, is predominantly white is problematic for the student populations and communities served by academic libraries. These demographics only perpetuate the stereotype, particularly for students of color, that librarianship is a “white profession.” When students of color see and interact with librarians of their same ethnic group or race, they can begin to see librarianship as an inclusive profession, welcoming to someone like them. There are diversity issues like this and many more that draw upon identity theory.

Interestingly, during our writing process for this chapter, one of us was approached by a student at her institution who randomly said, “It’s so good to see a person of color behind the desk!” The experience acknowledged the stereotype of librarianship as a white profession, but also validated our pursuit of understanding the impact diversity has on students and librarians.

To best serve our communities, to transform the profession, we must understand and get to the root of these stereotypes. We are really honored and excited to be a part of this book, among other scholars and practitioners all working toward the same goal.

Q3: What sparked your interest to write this chapter?

The idea for this chapter began with a series of conversations during the summer of 2012 when we met at The Minnesota Institute for Early Career Librarians from Traditionally Underrepresented Groups (MIECL), a week-long professional development program. We instantly formed a sense of community with each other and our cohort of librarians of color and quickly realized that we shared similar experiences as people of color in academia. Later on, when we learned about the call for chapters for a book exploring librarian perception, stereotypes, and identity, we saw it a perfect opportunity to transform our conversations into an analytical exploration. The sense of community and shared experiences found at MIECL ultimately influenced the motivation for our chapter.

Q4: Who is your librarian role model?

Juleah: Leo Lo from Kansas State University because he approaches life with a wholeness, in librarianship and beyond. And he challenges himself as a person, tackling goals in life like visiting all 50 states or learning to do the splits in his 45 before 45 project.

Isabel: I’m going to second Leo! Another librarian role model for me is Bohyun Kim from University of Maryland, Baltimore. Wildly productive, extremely active in the profession, fierce tech skills, and always smiling, Bohyun motivates me to be a better librarian in every way possible. And, the extremely witty and dynamic Ginger Williams of Valdosta State University who reminds me to think critically about making the library better for its patrons. As she prepares to have her first child, I’m also inspired by how Ginger and other exceptionally active librarian moms balance motherhood with their career. 

Azusa: Yes, Leo is a hero for all of us. My long term librarian role model is Keiko Yokota-Carter (currently at University of Michigan) who was “my” subject librarian during graduate studies at University of Washington. She helped me survive in a graduate school and find this rewarding career as a librarian. Since then she has guided me to pursue this career, and 10 years after my first encounter of her, I came back to University of Washington to take the position my librarian role model used to be in. 

Q5: Tell us something fun about yourselves/yourself!

In order to write this chapter we met weekly, from three different time zones, and collectively worked on it from at least six different countries including Japan, Mexico, Myanmar and more. We literally carried this project all over the world! 

revisiting these angolan #45 finds #digging #lisbon #portugal #afrolusodiasporicsounds 1 note

revisiting these angolan #45 finds #digging #lisbon #portugal #afrolusodiasporicsounds

bom dia! first #cup of #coffee in this 99¢ #thriftstorefind. 12 notes

bom dia! first #cup of #coffee in this 99¢ #thriftstorefind.

#tiles #lisboa #potugal (em Lisboa, Portugal)

#tiles #lisboa #potugal (em Lisboa, Portugal)

#tbt my dad (center) with his thai posse. they all worked at the same hotel in bangkok and immigrated to los angeles together. they&#8217;re still friends to this day. this picture was taken a few months after they arrived in la ca. september 1971. #roots #migrationisahumanright #dadsaretheoriginalhipsters

#tbt my dad (center) with his thai posse. they all worked at the same hotel in bangkok and immigrated to los angeles together. they’re still friends to this day. this picture was taken a few months after they arrived in la ca. september 1971. #roots #migrationisahumanright #dadsaretheoriginalhipsters